Treasures in the Winter Vault

Academics’ Choice Award Winner–Smart Book Award
Mom’s Choice Award
Creative Child Magazine Preferred Choice Award
Gold Reader’s Favorite International Book Award–Best Children’s Educational

Illustrated by Kevin Greene

Bobby wants a tablet but to his dismay, he spent his money on comic books and candy. His parents are teaching him a lesson and he thinks it’s unfair. What do you think? His grandparents come to visit and Grandma tells Bobby a story about an elephant who makes him realize if he works hard and spends his money more wisely, he could have enough money to buy the things he wants.

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Academics’ Choice Award Winner–Smart Book Award
Mom’s Choice Award
Creative Child Magazine Preferred Choice Award
Gold Reader’s Favorite International Book Award–Best Children’s Educational

Bobby wants a tablet but to his dismay, he spent his money on comic books and candy. His parents are teaching him a lesson and he thinks it’s unfair. What do you think? His grandparents come to visit and Grandma tells Bobby a story about an elephant who makes him realize if he works hard and spends his money more wisely, he could have enough money to buy the things he wants. Debbie Bertram and Lisa Detanna bring financial literacy to the younger set with a tale of friendship, family, and key elements toward saving for the future. Beautifully illustrated by talented artist, Kevin Greene, Treasures in the Winter Vault will delight all ages.

Lisa Detanna and the Global Wealth Solutions Group of Raymond James Beverly Hills are honored to be sponsoring numerous Financial Literacy Tours with the rock group GOODING in 2015. The Financial Literacy Tour uses the power of a live rock performance and personal stories to inspire young people with lessons of finance and discipline to help them see their own dreams as possibilities. Through a concert, multimedia presentation and talkback, they discuss the danger of credit card debt and benefits of saving early, while exposing the myth of rock stars, athletes and actors who sell the false image of overnight success. Students who do not receive this message early, often drop out of college and get caught in a cycle of financial irresponsibility.

For more information on how to begin conversations about money and other financial matters with your children and grandchildren, as well as our upcoming series of classes for adults, young adults and children, please visit raymondjames.com/globalwealthsolutionsgroup

Author

Debbie Bertram, Lisa Detanna

Cover

Hardcover, Paperback

Size

8.5 x 8.5

Pages

32

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About the Authors

Lisa Detanna has been providing wealth manage- ment advice to a diverse base of affluent individuals and families for more than 20 years. She offers a wide variety of services, including personal financial planning, investment management, insurance planning, estate and gift planning, philanthropy, tax planning, risk management services, family governance and family office services.

She joined Raymond James as a senior vice president of investments in December 2011. Previously, she held senior vice president positions at Wedbush, Citi Smith Barney, Morgan Stanley and Imperial Capital (formerly Dabney/Resnick), and began her career at Drexel Burnham Lambert’s capital markets group in Beverly Hills.

One of the best legacies we can leave our children is the knowledge and understanding of being good stewards of wealth. Teaching them monetary self-sufficiency balanced with a sense of helping others less fortunate provides them with a priceless guide they can use throughout their lives.

My grandfather taught me these practical lessons as a child. If I wanted something, he would tell me to “clock in” which meant punching in and out on a time card. To earn the object of my desire, I rolled coins, folded towels and answered the switch board. This “pay to play mentality” taught me that if I wanted something, I had to work for it. Grandpa taught me to save by taking me to the bank each week to make the deposits for the business and for myself. He taught me that the principles of managing my money varied little whether I had $1,000 or $1 million dollars. He also showed me through example to never have a hand out but rather to have a hand in to help those in need.

If you wish to give your child a head start by planting the seeds of wealth management early in their lives, we can help.